May - Speech & Hearing Awareness Month

 

 

 

 

We’re Here to Help – More Than You Think
OSLA members are involved at the front line of health care and learning.  Our members address a broad range of communication challenges impacting everyday life. Swallowing, feeding, balance, hearing loss, speaking, language, literacy, cognitive communication challenges caused by illness, learning disabilities, aging, or injury. 

During COVID-19, our patients and clients still need us.  We’re finding ways to be there – by phone, online, and in person. Learn more during May – Speech and Hearing Awareness Month! 


Who we are

OSLA members are regulated health professionals. Speech-Language Pathologists (SL-Ps) and Audiologists are recognized under the: Regulated Health Professions Act & Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology Act.  S-LPs and Audiologists hold a Master’s or Doctorate degree and are licensed by the College of Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists of Ontario (CASLPO).


Who we help

What: Often people think of stuttering or hearing loss, but OSLA members help people to overcome a broad range of challenges in hearing, speaking, language, cognitive communication, literacy, swallowing, feeding and balance.

Why: The causes are varied including, but are not limited to: autism, dementia, ADHD, depression or anxiety, concussion, learning disability, stroke, Parkinson’s, cancer, vocal nodules, acoustic neuroma, gastro esophageal reflux disease, aspiration pneumonia, aging and frailty, or environmental factors such as noise.

Where: You’ll find S-LPs and Audiologist in all care settings: schools, hospitals, community treatment centres, clinics, long term care homes, and private practice.


 

We’re Here to Help – Now More Than Ever
During COVID-19, our members are continuing to meet the needs of their patients and clients virtually, and when needed in person. But the need for care is rapidly increasing with the growing and aging population. From hospital and community care S-LPs in full Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), to working through therapy plans online with school-age children, to providing hearing aid batteries via curbside service ...OSLA members are helping more than you think!

Our Key Messages

  1. We’re Here to Help – More Than You Think
  2. OSLA members are involved at the front line of health care and learning.
  3. During COVID-19, our patients and clients still need us. We’re finding ways to be there – by phone, online, and in person.
  4. Our members address a broad range of communication challenges impacting everyday life. Swallowing, feeding, balance, hearing loss, speaking, language, literacy, cognitive communication challenges caused by illness, learning disabilities, aging, or injury.
  5. Learn more in May – Speech and Hearing Awareness Month 

Share our Social Media Posts 

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook where you can share our posts! Don't forget to tag us in your social media posts using the handles below. 

 

You can also use the following #hastags in your posts:

#Speech

#hearing

#SpeechandHearingMonth 

#We'reHere2Help

#MoreThanYouThink 

Our Facebook account:

www.facebook.com/OSLAontario/

Our Twitter account: 

https://twitter.com/osla_ontario

Our May Month Fast Facts

Please feel free to share on your website, social media accounts or via email. 

"Physical, cognitive, communicative & emotional symptoms may follow a concussion. approximately 20% of individuals experience ongoing problems that interfere with return to regular activity." 
"Communication disorders are among the strongest predictors for discriminating among dementia subtypes."
"17.3% of Ontarians have a learning disability, while 5.2% have a developmental disability."
"Swallowing disorders affect...  up to 64% of patients after stroke, up to 30% of elderly admitted to the hospital, up to 38% of seniors who live independently and up to 68% of long-term care residents."
"In Ontario, more than 40% of students have learning disabilities, yet few children with dyslexia receive the early identification and intervention that they require."

"Evidence shows that the use of hearing aids may slow the progression and impact of cognitive decline."

"Evidence shows communication skills training with caregivers & health care professionals, improves the quality of life AND well-being of patients with dementia."
"Hearing loss is the fastest growing chronic condition facing Canadians today."

" 1 in 6 people in Canada have a speech, language, or hearing disorder."

Share your Stories 

 

On The Front Lines

A day in the life of  Speech-Language Pathologists working in acute care and rehab hospitals will see a wide range of patients who require assistance with their communication and swallowing abilities as a part of their recovery. Often these patients are frail and elderly with underlying conditions that predispose them to swallowing difficulties and serious life-threatening complications if not managed appropriately. 

During this pandemic, many patients with COVID-19 will require intubations and ventilation for long periods of time. Swallowing, thinking and communicating are some of the most basic of functions for which specialized care and rehabilitation are required to get out of the ICU, safely start swallowing and eating, communicate with loved ones, and eventually be able to leave the hospital. 

While management of swallowing disorders often involves exposure to respiratory droplets or triggers the release of airborne particles, speech-language pathologists continue to work hard for their patients during COVID-19 doing what they always do - helping people live the most functional lives possible.

During Speech and Hearing Awareness Month, we salute these front-line health care professionals! Learn more at www.osla.on.ca/maymonth2020

 

 - Written by Avital Winer, M.S.c SLP(C) Reg. CASLPO

The Essential Role of S-LPs

Speech-Language Pathologists (S-LPs) in health care are an essential service and we are working very hard as part of the frontline during this pandemic. We conduct swallowing assessments, which means we are exposed to coughing and come in contact with sputum and mucous membranes.  Swallowing dysfunction can be a life threatening complication of various health conditions including head and neck cancers, neurological conditions such as stroke and Parkinson’s disease, respiratory diseases to name a few.  Swallowing may become problematic following endotracheal intubation, which has become an unfortunate reality for some patients who have contracted COVID-19. Swallowing dysfunction can lead to choking, pneumonia, malnutrition and even death.

Beyond swallowing, SLPs are instrumental in facilitating a person’s ability to communicate. Can you imagine if you could not speak or understand what was being said? Communication is what connects us all as human beings. Now more than ever, the world has experienced the need to connect with other people, that communication is essential in our lives. 

 
- Written by Patty Matsuo M.A.,S-LP(C), M.H.Sc., CHE, Reg. CASLPO

Experiences of a Speech-Language Pathologist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Navigating the Frontline

Check out OSLA Member and Speech-Language Pathologist, Marissa James's blog Experiences of a Speech-Language Pathologist during the COVID-19 Pandemic: Navigating the Frontline as she chronicles her experiences as an S-LP navigating her way through the frontline maze during the COVID-19 pandemic. Marissa is hoping to bring awareness to what it’s like to work with and support people infected by COVID-19.

 

 

 

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